Long prison term for child rape, child porn

A Warren man will serve 15 to 40 years in prison after pleading guilty Monday to a host of felony charges ranging from rape of a child to child pornography.

Edward D. Montgomery, 55, of Warren entered a negotiated plea for offenses that took place between 2008 and September 2013.

Among the charges Montgomery pleaded to were three that involved a child under the age of 13 and carried a combined mandatory minimum prison term of 25 years.

Montgomery was charged with rape of a child, which carries a mandatory minimum jail term of 10 years and maximums of 40 years in prison and $25,000 fine; involuntary deviate sexual intercourse with child, with a 10-year mandatory minimum, and maximums of 40 years and $25,000; aggravated indecent assault, five-year minimum, maximums of 20 years and $25,000; unlawful contact with a minor – sexual offenses, up to 20 years and $25,000; statutory sexual assault, 20 years and $25,000; endangering the welfare of a child, seven years and $15,000; two separate counts of indecent assault, each with a seven-year and $15,000 maximum; corruption of minors, seven years and $15,000; 12 counts of dissemination of child pornography, each carrying a maximum term of seven years and a maximum fine of $15,000; 19 counts of possession of child pornography, also carrying maximum penalties of seven years and $15,000 each; and criminal use of a communications facility, another seven-year and $15,000 maximum.

In all, if found guilty of all counts at trial, Montgomery would have faced up to 392 years in prison and a maximum combined fine of $665,000.

Montgomery will have to undergo sexual offender assessment and register as a sex offender.

Montgomery quietly answered, “Yes, your honor,” every time Judge Maureen Skerda asked him if he admitted to the conduct detailed in each of the offenses in the docket.

Deputy Attorney General Anthony Marmo and Montgomery’s attorney, Robert Kinnear, submitted the plea as a binding agreement. If the court did not accept the terms and imposed a different sentence, Montgomery would have had the right to go to trial.

Skerda accepted the plea.