Disc golf pitched for Washington Park

Fore!

It is in its very early stages, but a proposal for a disc golf course at Washington Park was heard by the City of Warren Parks and Recreation Commission last week.

Acting largely on his own, Warren resident Rob Baker pitched the idea, citing disc golf as “very popular” in the south as well as on college campuses.

According to the Professional Disc Golf Association, disc golf “is played much like traditional golf. Instead of a ball and clubs, however, players use a flying disc. The sport was formalized in the 1970s, and shares with ‘ball golf’ the object of completing each hole in the fewest number of strokes (or, in the case of disc golf, fewest number of throws).”

Baker said that the discs can cost as little as $10 and that a good course would have 18 holes and take approximately 90 minutes to play.

“You want the terrain up and down, a little bit rough,” he said, characteristics that can be found at the 65-acre Washington Park.

Baker also presented an educational program that would utilize the game of disc golf to reinforce concepts of math and science. He also suggested the possibility of a league night.

He estimated the cost to install one hole at $400 and that about two acres would be needed for the entire course.

Baker explained that there are skid roads and landings at Washington Park from past logging ventures that could be utilized in the course’s development. “I’m willing to volunteer my time for whatever to get this kicked off,” he told the commission.

According to Baker, the closest course is in South Dayton, N.Y. He cited the family-friendliness of the game as a key benefit.

“I would love to see Washington Park utilized,” said Commission member Judi Wilson.

“There has been a previous proposal” for disc golf, said City Administrator Mary Ann Nau. “(It) was for Betts Park. There is just so much down there.”

She said the city will look at one of the educational programs “that we could maybe incorporate into the summer playground program…. That would let you know how much interest there would be in the community.”

Commission Chairman Dennis Crandall advised Baker on the process, suggesting that he come back to the commission at its next meeting on April 8 with a formal presentation.

“What you need to do in that is give us an idea, the cost of things, what you’re really looking at,” Crandall said.

He also suggested that Baker examine which section of Washington Park he wished to utilize.

Speaking generally of the project, Nau said, “These are the kinds of things the recreation customers moving to Warren (look for). The more outdoor stuff you can have (the better).”

“It’s great exercise,” Baker added.