Master Gardeners planning for spring

Penn State Extension Master Gardeners will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at the Jefferson DeFrees Family Center, Second Ave., Warren.

The “Come Grow With Us” symposium will be held Saturday, April 13, at the Allegheny Community Center, 42 Clark St. The all-day event will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Denise Schreiber, keynote speaker, is the author of Eat Your Roses, Pansies, Lavender and 49 Other Delicious Flowers, and will present “Edible Flowers.” Denise started the popular Edible Flowers Food Fest held in Pittsburgh every July. She is the greenhouse manager for Allegheny County Parks and is a regular on KDKA’s Sunday morning radio show “The Organic Gardeners.”

Eleven other garden related topics will be presented though out the event. The cost is $30 and includes lunch. Call the Warren Penn State Extension Office to register, or go online at agsci.psu.edu/come-grow . You must pre-register. Register as soon as possible, as some classes are limited.

Judy Kepple will chair the annual plant sale at Betts Park. The tentative date is Friday, May 31, for set up and June 1 for the sale. Master Gardeners interested in helping with either the plant sale or the garden flea market should contact Kepple. Master Gardeners are also accepting any plant donations (annual, perennial or landscape), unused planting containers of any size, and items for the garden flea market.

Winter gardening tips:

Plan your vegetable and flower beds. A garden plan will help you make better use of you space and ensure that you rotate crops from year to year.

Order flower and vegetable seeds. You may also want to share seeds with your friends.

Group containers that have been left outdoors for stability in high winds and for insulation.

Wrap terra-cotta pots in bubble plastic or pack in mulch for protection against frost.

Clean any garden tools that were hastily put away. Sharpen the tools if need be and oil or varnish

any wooden handles to prevent splinters.

Build or plan a raised bed.

Make any garden stakes or wire cages.

Put up new bird boxes and repair any old boxes or feeders. You may want to consider adding a bat house. Bats serve a useful purpose by eating insects and giving them a home away from the house or barn is a good idea.

Prune wisteria and most trees, including apples and pears, in late winter.

If you attend to these late winter projects you will be better prepared for your outdoor spring tasks and get a head start in this year’s garden.